Sydney Markets Fresh Fruit Vegetable & Flower Report
5 - 11 JULY 2021


FRUIT

Fruit Warm winter desserts made with seasonal fruit are comforting and rewarding use versatile Granny smith apples at ($2-$5 a kilo) depending on size, to make apple and golden syrup pudding or roast classic Beurru bosc pears ($3-$5 a kilo) to create satisfying tray of roasted pears with honey and walnuts.

Luscious Queensland grown strawberries bring a burst of sunshine to your diet. Wash and eat straight from the punnet or add to your favourite home-baked goodies. Delicious in crumbles, muffins, pies and puddings. It’s time to make the most of flavour-packed strawberries for $3-$5 a 250g punnet.

One of the most nutritious of all fruit, papaya has a high content of vitamin C (200g would provide 2-3 days’ supply) and beta carotene. Prices are easing on red-fleshed papaya, this week expect to pay $3-$6 a kilo.

An increase in supply should see banana prices at your local greengrocers have dropped a little in price this week to $4-$5 a kilo.

Oranges are plentiful and there are a few choices to enjoy. Traditional navels oranges ($2-$5 a kilo), Cara Cara navels ($4-$6) and vibrant new season blood oranges ($3-$5 a kilo).

Use tangy juice lemons to make luscious desserts or combine the zest of lemons with crushed garlic, parsley and olive oil to make a super tasty gremolata to drizzle or soup, osso buco or slow-roasted lamb shanks. Lemons are $2-$5 a kilo.

Winter is a great time to enjoy fresh Medjool dates. Plump, soft and caramel tasting fresh dates are also a good source of vitamin C, which is essential to help prevent infection. Add dates to a curry, enjoy as a snack or whip a Medjool date and banana self-saucing puddings. Medjool dates are $10-$20 a kilo, depending on grade.

Juicy, sweet eating Queensland pineapples are $2-$4 each depending on size. Warm chunks of pineapple in butter and brown sugar for a quick dessert or thread onto kebabs with chicken and red capsicum and char-grill.

VEGETABLES

Vegetables Ward off winter chills with hearty homemade veggie soups packed with seasonal veggies packed with flavour and goodness. Knobbly bulb veggie celeriac is at its best in winter. Celeriac has a delicate celery flavour and is delicious when mashed to serve on the side or hero this winter classic in a creamy celeriac, leek and smoked fish chowder. Celeriac is $4-$6 a bulb.

Bok choy is the perfect partner for authentic Asian flavours. Serve this fast cooking leafy green veggie with garlic, oyster sauce, chilli and ginger, as a side dish or in soups and laksa, in curries, casseroles and stir-fries. Bok Choy is $1-$2 a bunch.

Add a refreshing crunch to your winter salads, blanch and serve toss with other greens or stir-fries with snow peas. Like other peas, the fresher they are, the sweeter they will eat, so don’t store them for too long in the refrigerator. Snow peas are a thrifty buy this week at $5-$10 a kilo.

Take advantage of winter’s bountiful harvest and lockdown to create a range of tempting dishes fennel dishes that will satisfy your savoury crazings. Try this tasty braised fennel and tomato with salmon or fennel, leek and chickpea soup.

Cooking with herbs and spices is a fabulous way to boost the flavour. Cumin has a warm, earthy taste and fragrance with a hint of sweetness and bitterness; it is a key component of curry powder. Team ground cumin with nutritious winter cauliflowers ( $2-$4 ahead), carrots ($1.50-$3 a kilo) and brushed potatoes ($2-$3 a kilo) to create Indian spiced winter vegetables; this delicious dish is ideal for serving as a side dish or vegetarian meal.

Mushrooms are a powerhouse of nutrients and flavour. Add them to a risotto; make a bowl of piping hot soup or use in beef stroganoff. Button, cups and flat mushrooms are $8-$12 a kilo, while shiitake and oysters are $4 for a 100g punnet.

Unique, colourful and extra-tasty Heirloom tomatoes are grown in glass-houses at this time of year. Tomatoes are sold in trays at the Sydney Markets with greengrocers offering various shapes and colours to choose from. Tomatoes can be brown, yellow, black, purple, pink, or white, and some varieties are bicoloured and striped. Generally softer in texture, heirloom tomatoes are super tasty; taste the difference, but expect to pay $12-$15 a kilo.

Broccoli is at its best quality in the colder months. Select broccoli with firm compact buds and firm. Delicious steamed, stir-fried or puree and make an antioxidant-rich soup. Expect to pay $3-$4 a kilo this week.

Celery is also a protective vegetable and renowned for its anti-inflammatory properties. So adding celery to your winter soups and casseroles is a healthy choice; celery is $2-$4 a bunch. Many greengrocers sell celery bunch half a bunch too.

Large plump leeks have a delicate onion flavour. Add finely chopped leek to soups, burger mixtures, bolognaise sauce, casseroles, or braise with thyme until soft to serve on the side. Large plump leeks are $2.50-$3 each.

Red and green capsicums prices are back a little this week to $2-$6 a kilo. Red capsicums are the sweetest eating. Add capsicum to pizza toppings, salads, stir-fries, char-grill or stuff with a meat and vegetable filling and bake until tender.

Beetroot is a thrifty buy at $2-$3 a kilo, this week. Winter is the perfect time to discover the beetroot sweet earthy flavour and versatility, boiled, roasted or steamed, it is truly delicious.

FLOWERS

Flowers Your local florist has a superb selection of winter blooms. Save time and order online. It’s time to enjoy poppies, purple iris, freesia, tulips, cymbidium orchids, lilies, stock, sweetpeas, protea, banksia, kale, delphinium, roses bird of paradise, lavender, snapdragon, protea, iris, leucadendron, oriental lilies, Geraldton wax, cotton, lavender, hyacinth, jonquils and daffodils are a thrifty buy.



Prices quoted in this report are only relevant for the week of the report. All prices are estimates only as prices vary depending on variety, size and quality of produce and the trading area. For further information please contact Sue Dodd, tel 0438 725 453


Published On 2021-07-05 12:56:00

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