Sydney Markets Fresh Fruit Vegetable & Flower Report
11 - 17 OCTOBER 2021


FRUIT

Fruit Supercharge your breakfast with blueberries. Ultra nutritious and brimming with beneficial antioxidants, blueberries are low in kilojoule and only at $3-$6, depending on the punnet and blueberry size. Try these easy serving suggestions

  • Add a handful of blueberries to your favourite breakfast smoothie.
  • Team blueberries with strawberries, papaya and oranges in a delicious vitamin C-rich fruit salad, topped with a dollop of coconut flavoured yoghurt.
  • Layer blueberries with bircher muesli, toasted almonds and vanilla yoghurt.
  • Sprinkle blueberries over pancakes with fresh ricotta and a drizzle of maple syrup.
  • Tantalising Northern Territory mangoes are plentiful, and the quality is superb. Select from Kensington Pride and the R2E2 varieties. Mangoes are $2-$5 each, depending on size and the variety. Look for tray specials of mangoes for around $20-$40 at your local greengrocer. This week serve up these super tasty mango muffins.

    Quality raspberries and blackberries are a tasty buy at $5-$7 a punnet. Your local greengrocer may also sell Queensland fruit for $1.50-$2 a punnet; it’s a great buy but use within a day of purchasing.

    Naturally sweet and refreshing rockmelons are in season and available for $3-$5 each, depending on the size. Rockmelon makes an ideal snack or sensational dessert for the diet conscious. Enjoy melon al natural or combine with passionfruit, ginger, tropical fruits or berries to create heavenly desserts. Keep an eye out for sweet eating, new season Candy melons at your local greengrocers too.

    Bananas are a naturally sweet storehouse of carbohydrates, vitamins and fibre. The ever-popular Cavendish variety ($2.50-$4 a kilo) is a great all-rounder whilst the smaller sweeter Ladyfinger or sugar bananas at ($6-$7 a kilo) are perfect for snacking and fruit salads.

    Versatile late-season lemons are a kitchen essential. Lemon juice and zest add flavour to marinades, cakes, steamed puddings o, try drizzling lemon juice over a chicken before roasting to embellish the flavour. Select lemons that feel heavy for their size; this indicates good juice content. Lemons are $3-$5 a kilo.

    Golden fleshed, juicy and sweet Queensland pineapples are a good buy at $3-$5 each, depending on size. These aromatic Sri Lankan chilli pineapple with chicken skewers are ideal for a mid-week family meal.

    Small quantities of new season peaches and nectarines are starting to arrive in the Sydney Markets from Northern NSW.

    New Zealand kiwifruit are plentiful and eating sweet, expect to pay $3-$5 a kilo.

    VEGETABLES

    Vegetables Golden fleshed kumara tubers are excellent value at $2-$5 a kilo. Add diced and roasted low GI kumara to salads; they also make delicious wedges or try serving roasted kumara with eggs and avocado salsa.

    Aussie asparagus is a top buy at $1-$2 a bunch; why stop at one bunch. Add trimmed bunches of asparagus to risottos, blanch, toss in a spring salad with broad beans, enjoy bunches barbecued or toss in a hot wok with king prawns and crushed garlic.

    Fresh spring beetroot is delectable. Cut into fine julienne strips and sprinkle over a salad just before serving adds vibrant colour, sweet flavour and a crunchy texture. Beetroot is great value at $2-$3 a bunch.

    Fresh and tasty bok choy is delicious steamed or tossed in a hot wok; select bunches with crunchy pale stems and fresh-looking green leaves. Bok choy is a bargain at $1-$2 a bunch. This red chilli beef with bok choy dish can be on the table in 30 minutes.

    Tasty broad beans are a source of protein and iron, making them especially valuable for those who choose a vegetarian diet. Choose firm green broad beans with plump rather than bulging pods. Smaller young pods house the most tender beans. As a guide, 1 kg broad beans yields about 250g (1 cup) shelled beans. Savour the flavour of broad beans this week for around $4-$6 a kilo. Try this broad bean, spinach and lamb salad.

    Leafy kale at $1-$3 a bunch is good value nutritionally and value for money. Use kale in similar ways to spinach. Add kale to healthy veggie or Buddha bowls like this green veggie, avocado and egg Bowls.

    Crispy Victorian grown celery is delightful raw or cooked. Team celery with chicken, rockets and lemon mayonnaise for a light lunch. Celery is a top spring buy at $2-$4 a bunch.

    Fennel is in peak supply; the quality is top-notch, and it’s a bargain at $1.50-$2 a bulb.

    Super healthy and ultra-versatile broccoli is retailing for $4-$5 a kilo at your local greengrocer. Broccoli and sweetcorn buttermilk hotcakes are a great way to ‘hide’ green veggies; these delicious hotcakes can be served hot for breakfast or brunch or chilled in the school lunch box. Freeze any leftover hotcakes between sheets of baking paper in an airtight plastic container.

    Crisp, locally grown Lebanese cucumbers are plentiful and selling for $3-$4 kilo. Grate cucumbers and mix with yoghurt and crushed garlic for a quick and healthy dip or dressing.

    Versatile and affordable zucchini are in good supply at your local greengrocers. Add mild-tasting to a spaghetti Bolognese, frittata, meatloaf, pasta dishes, muffins, cakes, burger patties and char-grilled to add to salads. Zucchinis are $3-$5 a kilo, depending on size. A seasonal favourite- Spring zucchini flowers are also in season.

    FLOWERS

    Flowers Spring flowers are abundant and varied. It’s time to enjoy David Austin roses, blushing bride, Australian peonies, boronia, lilac, guelder rose (snowball), chincherinchee, branch artichokes, red and white waratahs, king protea, sweet peas, stock, snapdragons, Queen Anne’s lace, flannel flowers, daisies, tulips, ranunculus, freesias, stock, iris, lavender, kangaroo paw, tiger lilies, poppies, bird of paradise, gerbera and delphinium.




    Prices quoted in this report are only relevant for the week of the report. All prices are estimates only as prices vary depending on variety, size and quality of produce and the trading area. For further information please contact Sue Dodd, tel 0438 725 453


    Published On 2021-10-11 10:27:00

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