What's In Season

Autumn

Savoy Cabbage

With its wrinkled crunchy leaves that have a high water content and are rich in fibre, this mild tasting cabbage is the quintessential fresh autumn green.

Greengrocers sell whole, halved and quartered Savoy cabbages. Choose ones with a fresh fragrance and crisp leaves with no signs of yellowing. Store whole or cut Savoy cabbage in a plastic bag in the fridge and use within a few days of purchase.

Top ways to use Savoy cabbage ...

  • Team shredded Savoy cabbage in an autumn slaw with shaved fennel, grated carrot, thinly sliced red onion and roasted hazelnuts.
  • Finely shred Savoy cabbage and toss through a stir-fry with a mix of mushrooms, sesame oil and soy sauce.

Grapes and Currants

Picked ripe and ready to eat, sweet juicy grapes are in bumper supply at your greengrocer.

Go for seedless

The green Thompson Seedless variety is a juicy favourite. Other seedless varieties include the oval-shaped pale green Menindee Seedless as well as the pinkish-red Crimson Seedless and darker pink Red Globe grapes.

For a juicy rich flavour

With its intense sweetness and tender juicy flesh, the Black Muscat grape is the perfect partner for cheese.

Currants

Succulent, sweet and simply bursting with flavour, these fresh little currant grapes are an autumn treat. Currants are available only for a very short time. They’re delicate so handle with care.

Fresh and in season

What's best in ...

March
Fruit Veggies
  • Apples
  • Bananas
  • Dates
  • Figs
  • Finger limes
  • Grapes
  • Guava
  • Kiwifruit
  • Limes
  • Mangosteens
  • Nashi
  • Oranges: Valencia
  • Passionfruit
  • Papaw
  • Pears
  • Plums
  • Pomegranates
  • Quinces
  • Tamarillo
  • Asian greens: Bok Choy
  • Beans
  • Broccoli
  • Capsicums
  • Chestnuts
  • Cucumbers
  • Eggplant
  • Eschallots
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Sweetcorn
  • Swiss chard
  • Tomatoes
  • Witlof
  • Zucchini
April
Fruit Veggies
  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Custard apples
  • Dates
  • Finger limes
  • Grapes
  • Guava
  • Kiwifruit
  • Limes
  • Mandarins: Imperial
  • Nashi
  • Pears
  • Passionfruit
  • Persimmons
  • Pomegranates
  • Quinces
  • Tamarillo
  • Asian greens: Bok Choy
  • Beans
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Capsicums
  • Cauliflower
  • Chestnuts
  • Chokos
  • Eggplant
  • Eschallots
  • Fennel
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Swiss chard
  • Turnips
  • Witlof
May
Fruit Veggies
  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Custard apples
  • Dates
  • Grapes
  • Kiwifruit
  • Lemons
  • Mandarins: Imperial
  • Nashi
  • Oranges: Navel
  • Pears
  • Persimmons
  • Pomegranates
  • Quinces
  • Rhubarb
  • Asian greens: Bok Choy
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Celeriac
  • Chestnuts
  • Eggplant
  • Fennel
  • Kale
  • Ginger
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Parsnips
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Sweet potato
  • Swiss chard
  • Turnips

Choc-dipped apple party pops

Preparation 15 mins | Cooking 2 mins | Makes 8

Great for school fetes and celebrations, these pops can be stored in the fridge for up to 1 day. You’ll need 8 paddle-pop sticks for this recipe.

8 small Pink Lady or Royal Gala apples
375g dark or milk chocolate melts
Hundreds & thousands or crushed peanuts, for dipping

STEP 1 Line a baking tray with baking paper. Insert a paddle-pop stick into the core of each apple.

STEP 2 Melt chocolate melts, following packet directions, in a small deep heatproof bowl. Dip an apple, half way into the melted chocolate and rotate to coat. Drain any excess chocolate. Sprinkle chocolate with hundreds & thousands or crushed peanuts and place onto the tray to set. Repeat using remaining apples.

Roasted grape, rocket & prosciutto salad

Preparation 15 mins | Cooking 20 mins | Serves 4

350g purple seedless grapes, washed and dried
Olive oil cooking spray
12 thin slices prosciutto
50g rocket leaves
125g Persian or marinated feta, drained and roughly crumbled
⅓ cup walnuts, roasted and roughly chopped
Extra virgin olive oil, to serve
Sourdough bread, to serve

STEP 1 Preheat oven to 200°C fan-forced. Cut grapes in small clusters and place on a baking tray lined with baking paper. Lightly spray with oil. Roast for 15-20 minutes until very tender. Set aside to slightly cool.

Step 2 Arrange prosciutto, rocket, roasted grapes, feta and walnuts on a serving platter. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil. Season with pepper to taste. Serve with sourdough bread.

Yellow Button Squash

Like zucchinis, these versatile gems have a delicate flavour and tender flesh that pairs wonderfully with robust flavours.

Vibrant yellow with a spot of green, this veggie brightens everyday meals. Get creative because they can be used in so many dishes.

Quick & easy ways to cook button squash

  • Slice and pan-fry in olive oil and garlic with chopped red chilli. Serve with grated Parmesan.
  • Toss halved squash with olive oil and Moroccan spice then roast until tender. Top with Greek yoghurt to serve.
  • Finely shave button squash and toss with chives, crumbled marinated fetta and baby spinach in a salad with lemon and olive oil dressing.
  • Dice button squash and add to tomato pasta sauce. (This is a great way to sneak veggies into kids’ meals.)

Limes

Vivid green limes add a citrusy zing to drinks, marinades, sauces and salad dressings.

A key ingredient in Asian and Mexican dishes, limes team perfectly with avocado, coriander, mint, chilli, chicken, seafood and pork.

Grown in Australia, the seedless lime has a distinctive flavour with less acidity than lemon. Its thin skin makes it easy to zest, slice and juice.

Smaller deep green limes are picked ripe however those allowed to ripen a little longer on the tree develop a lighter yellowish green skin and generally contain the most juice.

For a quick lime and chilli salad dressing, combine ¼ cup lime juice, ¼ cup sweet chilli sauce, 1 tbs fish sauce and 1 tbs caster sugar in a screw-top jar, shake until well combined and serve.

For a zingy flavour, add the juice of lime to;

  • Mineral or tap water (at any time of day)
  • Marinades for chicken, pork and fish
  • Asian-style curries and Laksa
  • Cream cheese frostings

Top tips; Select vibrant limes that feel heavy for their size. Firmly roll limes on a bench

Fresh Asian Flavours

Curry Leaves

Delicate fresh green curry leaves add a citrusy spicy depth of flavour to curries. Toss in a handful of leaves to slow-cooked Indian dishes.

Fresh Turmeric

Fresh turmeric flesh tints dishes a vibrant golden colour. Wear disposable gloves when grating or chopping because it does stain. You can replace 1 tsp ground turmeric with 2 tsp freshly grated turmeric, or use as per your recipe.

Ginger

Ginger packs an intense flavour hit to a variety of dishes. Peel and grate, finely slice or chop the root.

Galangal

Fragrant galangal is favoured in Thai, Vietnamese and Indonesian cooking. It has a distinctive flavour with citrus and sweet pine undertones. Although it has smooth skin, it has dense flesh so it is best sliced rather than grated.

Green Onions

Sold in bunches, green onions are also called shallots. Trim and discard the root and the dark green tops before use. They’re best eaten raw of quickly cooked.

Kaffir Lime Leaves

These beautiful deep green leaves add a uniquely fragrant flavour to dishes. Sold in small bags or punnets in greengrocers, they keep well in the fridge. Add torn leaves to stocks and soups or very finely shred the leaves and use as a topping for Asian-inspired dishes.

Chillies

Sample the vast range of chillies available varying in colour, heat intensity and size. Smaller chillies are often the hottest. The intensely hot small red and green Bird’s Eye chillies are very popular.

Coriander

Sold by the bunch in greengrocers, coriander roots, stems and leaves feature highly in Asian cooking. Wash well before using. Blitz the roots and add to home-made curry pastes and marinades. Use the chopped stems in stocks and toss the leaves through salads and stir-fries.


 
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