What's In Season

Winter

Celeriac

Top tip: Select pale, small sized celeriac that feels heavy for its size.


How to prepare celeriac

Using a small sharp knife, peel the rough skin of the celeriac and cut the flesh into desired-sized pieces.

Once cut, immediately plunge the celeriac into a bowl of cold water with lemon juice to prevent discolouration. Drain and dry celeriac before use.

  • Add chopped celeriac to soups, casseroles and roasts.
  • Team celeriac with potatoes to make a creamy mash.
  • Grate raw celeriac and add to a winter slaw or a classic French remoulade sauce to serve with corned beef, fish or crab cakes.

New veggies in your greengrocer

Kalettes

The nutrient-packed kalette is a delicious cross between leafy kale and tiny Brussels sprouts. Small, frilly, purple-tinged kalettes have crunchy loosely-packed leaves with a slightly nutty flavour.

Quick cooking for crunch

Halve kalettes and toss into a stir-fry with meat or chicken. Finely-shredded kalettes bring colour and crunch to salads and winter slaws. They team particularly well with Asian-inspired dressings.

Fioretto

f you like cauliflower, you’ll love Fioretto! Also known as cauliflower blossom, it has crunchy long stems and tiny white edible florets which have a delicate cauliflower flavour.

Rapidly cook Fioretto to retain its colour and crunch. Use it in any recipe as an alternative to broccolini.


Fresh and in season

What's best in ...

June
Fruit Veggies
  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Banana
  • Custard apples
  • Dates
  • Grapefruit
  • Kiwifruit
  • Lemons
  • Mandarins
  • Nashi
  • Oranges: Cara Cara Navel
  • Oranges: Navel
  • Passionfruit
  • Pears
  • Pomelo
  • Quince
  • Rhubarb
  • Beetroot
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celeriac
  • Celery
  • Fennel
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Swede
  • Sweet potato
  • Turnips
July
Fruit Veggies
  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Banana
  • Custard apples
  • Dates
  • Grapefruit
  • Kiwifruit
  • Lemons
  • Mandarins
  • Nashi
  • Oranges: Cara Cara Navel
  • Oranges: Navel
  • Pomelo
  • Quince
  • Rhubarb
  • Strawberries
  • Tangelos
  • Beetroot
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celeriac
  • Celery
  • Fennel
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Swede
  • Sweet potato
  • Turnips
  • Witlof
August
Fruit Veggies
  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Banana
  • Cumquat
  • Grapefruit
  • Kiwifruit
  • Lemons
  • Mandarins
  • Oranges: Blood
  • Oranges: Navel
  • Pomelo
  • Rhubarb
  • Strawberries
  • Tangelos
  • Beetroot
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celeriac
  • Celery
  • Fennel
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Swede
  • Sweet potato
  • Turnips
  • Witlof

Fresh for Kids

Apple, roast pumpkin & sausage subs

Preparation 40 mins | Cooking 35 mins | Serves 6

8 medium Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and chopped
¼ cup caster sugar
¼ cup water
½ cup sultanas
Reduced fat ice-cream or cream, to serve

Pecan crumble topping:
½ cup plain flour
¼ cup brown sugar
½ tsp ground cinnamon
75g unsalted butter, chopped ½ cup pecan nuts, chopped
⅓ cup shredded coconut

Step 1 Combine apples, caster sugar and water in a large (wide) microwave safe dish. Cover and microwave on high for 12-15 minutes, stir through sultanas. Set aside to cool for 15 minutes.

Step 2 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan-forced. To make crumble topping, combine flour, sugar and cinnamon in a bowl. Rub in butter until mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs. Stir in pecans and coconut.

Step 3 Spoon apple mixture into 6 x 1 cup greased ovenproof ramekins. Top with crumble topping. Place ramekins onto a baking tray. Bake for 20-25 minutes until hot and golden. Cool slightly and serve with ice-cream or cream.

Superfood ... Broccolini

Highly-nutritious broccolini is a superb choice for winter. Select bunched broccolini with crisp vibrant green stems.

The crunchy stem and mini broccoli-like top can all be eaten, so no wastage!

Broccolini with pancetta & almonds

As featured on the cover

Preparation 10 mins | Cooking 15 mins

1 tbs olive oil
2 bunches broccolini
¼ cup slivered almonds 75g thinly sliced pancetta, chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tbs extra-virgin olive oil Lemon wedges, to serve

STEP 1 Half fill a large frying pan with water and bring to the boil over high heat. Add broccolini, cover and cook for 2 minutes until vibrant and almost tender. Drain and aside. Wipe pan dry with paper towel.

STEP 2 Heat olive oil in the frying pan over medium heat. Add almonds and cook, tossing often, until golden. Transfer almonds to a plate. Add pancetta and cook, tossing often, for 2-3 minutes until pancetta is crisp. Add garlic and broccolini and cook, tossing, over medium-high heat for 2-3 minutes until hot. Toss through almonds and extra-virgin olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve with lemon wedges. Serves 4 as a side dish.

Know your onions

Green onions are also called shallots.

These green onions have long green stems with a small white underdeveloped bulb at the base. Simply discard the roots and the deep dark green tops before use. Green onions are best eaten raw or quickly cooked.

Brown onions

With a well-balanced yet distinct onion flavour, brown onions have crisp white flesh and papery brown skin. They’re the perfect all-rounder for cooking.

Red onions

These vibrant deep crimson-skinned onions have crunchy white flesh tinged with red. They are sometimes incorrectly called Spanish onions. Finely sliced or chopped, red onions can be eaten raw in salads and salsas. Once cooked, they develop a subtle sweetness, which makes the red onion a popular one.

White onions

With their mild yet distinct onion flavour, fleshy white onions are good for barbecuing and general cooking.

Pickling onions

These small-sized onions (about the size of 20 cent coin) are perfect for pickling. Add whole peeled pickling onions to slow-cooked casseroles and roasts.

Spring onions

Sold by the bunch, spring onions are similar to green onions however they have a small white immature bulb at the end of the stem. They’re perfect for braising or slicing, or adding to soup, stir-fries and salads. They are sometimes incorrectly called salad onions.

Eschalots

These small onions grow in clusters and have papery golden-brown skin and are sometimes called French shallots. Sweeter than brown, white or red onions, eschalots have a distinct well-balanced onion flavour. They’re mainly used in French and Asian cooking.

Sumo Mandarins

PDespite its odd appearance, the loose bumpy-skinned and knobbly-stemmed Sumo mandarin is sure to gain fans this season. The juicy Sumo peels easily and as an added bonus, it’s seedless.

These super-sweet jumbo mandarins originated in Japan and are now grown in Australia.

A cross between an orange and mandarin, the Sumo (also known as Confruit) is sweeter and less acidic than an orange.

Like any citrus, these mandarins are a good source of vitamin C, potassium, folate and dietary fibre.

Sumo mandarins are available in greengrocers from July through to September.

Corella pears

This crisp dense white-fleshed pear is small to medium in size and has a distinct pinkish-red blush. It can be eaten raw or cooked. Leave fruit to ripen at room temperature. The Corella pear is ripe when it yields to gentle pressure around the stem.

Top ways to use Corella pears
  • Easily sliced into wedges, the flavoursome Corella is the ideal addition to cheese platters and salads. It’s also a great pear for snacking and the school lunch box.
  • Gently poach peeled whole slightly firm Corella pears in a light sugar syrup with a cinnamon stick, a drizzle of honey and a scattering of cloves. Serve warm with Greek-style yoghurt.

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